Could the Deadlift save your life?

The deadlift is hard. And you might not be particularly fond of bending over and picking up a large weight off the ground. But it might just save your life. 

You see, the deadlift uses lots of big, healthy, beautiful muscles in a long range of motion. And since so much muscle contributes to the lift, you can lift a lot of weight. And heavy weights get you strong. And the stronger you are–the healthier you are. Fact, Jack.

I know what you’re thinking…I don’t need to lift heavy weights. After all, your Doctor told you not to. As did your physical therapist. Even Mom chimed in. I hate to have to say it–but they’re all wrong. 100% wrong. Sorry Mom. 

Some people are immune to evidence. And it doesn’t matter how much quality research is cited–they will never believe that getting strong is important. They will continue to choose non weight bearing movements, aerobic dance, and the whole other cache of available fitness stuff. 

Instead of getting their deadlift up to 2x bodyweight, they focus on light weights done with high reps. Plus the usual cardio based programs.This is a mistake. 

I can introduce you to tens of hundreds of people who I have trained that will tell you that getting stronger was the best fitness thing they ever did. 

Stronger is healthier no matter what anyone says. This is not even controversial anymore. Getting strong is as good for you as is quitting smoking.

If you commit to strength training, you’ll improve your chances of keeping your mobility, stave off death, and live better. You’ll lose weight more easily, and virtually every marker of health will improve. Important stuff like mobility, bone health, blood glucose. That sort of stuff.

Enter the Deadlift.

The deadlift is not just safe when done right, it also does two very important things: 

1. It strengthens the entire body.

2. It produces new life giving muscle mass.

You can probably deadlift, and I can teach you how to do it properly. You’ll improve your strength rapidly. And you’ll like being stronger. 

Don’t be afraid of lifting heavy weights. Heavy doesn’t mean crazy. We mean heavy–appropriate for your strength level. We start light and add a little to the bar every time. It adds up. Give me a shout if you need help. 

person holding black barbell
Photo by Victor Freitas on Pexels.com

Leave a Reply